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Our Approach

The curriculum sequence outlined below indicates typical course progressions for students. A number of courses have prerequisites, all of which are outlined on individual dropdowns. Beyond the required subjects, students enjoy great freedom in choosing appropriate electives. Each course we offer is detailed within a dropdown below. Many students elect to continue their education during the summer, choosing from several offerings here at The Prep. See Summer Programs for more details.

Course Selection, Placement, and Change Policy
 
The Course Selection Process:   Course placement recommendations are based on the first trimester grades, and in many cases, additional criteria.  Any questions regarding Math, English, History, Science, Theology, and Language placement recommendations should be directed to teachers, and Department Chairpersons if necessary. Beginning in January, students will be scheduled for a meeting with their School Counselors to select their courses for the next year. School Counselors will screen student choices for their appropriate prerequisites and sequence requirements. Students should also be sure to discuss their choices for electives with their teachers, Department Chairpersons, other students, and their parents. Parents are asked to review their sons’ choices on the mySHP portal.  Placements are ultimately approved by Department Chairpersons and teachers, and decisions are pending final approval in June.  Changes to placements are made only at the teachers’ and Chairpersons’ discretion.  Students may initiate course changes after the course selection process concludes, but only if class space is available at that time.  

Fees: If a student requests a schedule change after we close course selection on the first day of summer school (see school calendar), there will be a $100 fee, and then only if there is room to accommodate that request. After August 28th the fee for a schedule change is $200. Students must know that after ten school calendar days in September no course changes are permitted, other than teacher-initiated level changes. Student initiated level changes after June 21st incur the fees indicated above.

English Curriculum

List of 6 items.

  • English Graduate Profile, Sequence, Guidelines

    All students are required to complete four years of English in order to graduate from Seton Hall Prep.

    The Prep graduate:
    1. will exhibit a knowledge of how language is used to communicate in various forms, and an understanding of the denotations, connotations and etymologies of words;
    2. will be able to read with understanding, think critically about what he has read, and respond intelligently to it;
    3. will develop the habit of reading widely and deeply, and thus be able to find and carefully consider ideas and information from disparate sources;
    4. will demonstrate sensitivity to artistic expression in writing and to the various art forms that communicate verbally and visually;
    5. will understand the distinction between language used to convey information and language used aesthetically;
    6. will manifest an ability to organize thoughts and express them coherently in both speech and writing;
    7. will have a sufficient understanding of the American and British literary traditions as well as other important literary traditions;
    8. will recognize patterns between historical/cultural periods and between various cultures and their literary traditions;
    9. will appreciate the ambiguities of human nature that are revealed in literature;
    10. will understand and appreciate the interconnectedness of reading, writing, listening, and speaking;
    11. will have produced a research paper that reflects competence in evolving a thesis, substantiating it with appropriate evidence that is obtained through familiarity with the techniques of research and the use of primary and secondary sources, and that demonstrates the ability to follow a format.
    English Scope and Sequence
     
    9th Grade
    10th Grade
    11th Grade
    12th Grade
    College Prep
    English I CP
    English II CP
    English III CP
    English IV CP
    Honors
    English I H
    English I H
    English I H
    English I H
    Advanced Placement
    English I High Honors
    English II High Honors
    AP English Language and Composition
    AP English Literature

    Guidelines > English I through English IV: From year to year, College Prep, Honors, and High Honors/Advanced Placement tracking is based on the performance assessment of the student’s English teacher. The department holds student tracking discussions by year’s end in order to place every student on the appropriate level for the following year.
  • English I

    English I (2012) is literature-based, consisting of book discussion and lectures on three major prose works, a Shakespeare play, short stories, and poetry. There is a daily emphasis on strengthening grammatical skills and vocabulary knowledge. Writing assignments, along with writer interviews, are used to improve analytical and creative writing skills. Independent reading and corresponding book interviews are used to encourage students to read for pleasure and the improvement of their reading skills.

    English I Honors (2014) is a demanding course that includes a significant amount of literature (five major prose works, a Shakespeare play, short stories, and poetry), writing (formal essays, reaction papers, and journal entries), grammar, vocabulary and an oral presentation on mythology. The primary goals are to increase the student’s appreciation of literature, to further develop his ability to think critically and analytically, and to better express himself in both writing and speech. Trimester grades are calculated from quizzes, tests, papers, presentations and participation.

    English I High Honors (2015) will have a two-fold approach to developing critical reading and writing skills. Students will learn how to use language as a means of communication by mastering a variety of writing mediums. Simultaneously, we will focus on fiction as a mode of artistic expression. In addition, students will study the critical terms that facilitate analysis and discussion of literature; they will learn the Greek and Latin foundations of our language; and they will continue to develop their writing portfolios, with journal entries, literary explications, and creative assignments. Students will also deliver a 
    number of presentations. Reading is intensive, as we cover such classics as Octavia Butler's Kindred, Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream, Elie Wiesel's Night, and Ray Bradbury's The Martian Chronicles, as well as both classic and contemporary short stories and some poetry.
  • English II

    English II (2022) primarily focuses on the three major forms of literature: fiction, drama, and poetry. Following up on students’ introductory work in freshmen English, the course further engages students in close readings of literary texts. Students will continue to learn about the mechanics of language and writing while developing their writing portfolio, with assignments that may be creative or critical, rhetorical or poetic.
     
    English II Honors (2024) builds on the vocabulary, composition, analytical reading, and critical thinking skills developed in freshman year. These skills will be developed further, especially those pertaining to literary analysis and effective written expression, in order to prepare the student for the broad historical and cultural study of American and British literatures covered in the junior and senior years. Students will be reading all genres of great literature, including plays, short stories, novels, essays and poetry. Vocabulary will be studied nightly and is an integral part of the course.
     
    English II High Honors (2025) builds on the vocabulary, composition, analytical reading, and critical thinking skills developed in freshman year. It attempts to develop these skills further, especially those pertaining to literary analysis and effective written expression, in order to prepare the student for the broad historical and cultural study of American and British literatures covered in the junior and senior years. The second year High Honors program expands on the normal sophomore material and deals with it in a more intense fashion. Here an even greater emphasis is placed on close textual analysis, which calls for a mature student willing to meet the challenges that should result in his being accepted into both the junior and senior Advanced Placement English sections. Students are also required to keep a journal in which they are expected to respond either to supplementary readings or to assignments for class discussion. Finally, each student is expected to meet with the teacher each trimester, outside regular class sessions, for a “personal” writing interview.
  • English III

    English III Writing Workshop (2342) is a course designed to work on writing fundamentals and is offered in addition to, not in place of, the regular English III course that focuses on American Literature. The course is designed as a workshop or writing lab course; class time will be dedicated to actual writing, small group review of the writing and one-on-one review of the written work with the teacher. While this course is an optional elective for all juniors, it will be a required course for students * who have demonstrated a clear need for additional help with writing.

    English III College Prep (2032)
    for juniors is designed to continue the student's development of essential skills in grammar, composition, vocabulary building and analytical reading and to enhance his understanding of literature and will build, in these areas, upon the training received in the first two years of the English program. The dominant feature of this course, however, will be the study of American literature.

    English III Honors (2034) for juniors follows both the essential form and content of the college prep level course, but the requirements in all areas are more demanding, especially in terms of the close analysis of literature and composition.
    Composition assignments are more challenging, with more stringent grading and greater emphasis upon refinements and subtleties of writing style. As with the College Prep level, each student is expected to have at least two interviews about his writing with his teacher in the course of the year.

    English III Advanced Placement (2035) for juniors embodies the form and content of the honors English program. Students will be prepared for and are expected to take the Advanced Placement test in English Language and Composition at the end of junior year. In addition, special attention is paid to the sort of close analysis of literature and composition that will be required of students when they take the AP examination in English Literature and Composition during their senior year. The course includes at least two major projects for AP students beyond the requirements of the honors course. One may involve topics that range from an analysis of American justice as depicted in key literary works to a treatment of the multifaceted nature of autumn, as well as their ability to react to it critically and analytically.
     
  • English IV

    English IV is offered on three academic levels: college prep, honors, and advanced placement. The members of the English department place students in the appropriate level of the course based on the students’ work in their previous English courses. Each student will have at least two writing interviews with the teacher at all three levels. One of the requirements for passing the course at all three levels is the satisfactory completion of a major research paper.

    English IV College Prep (2042) is the culmination of the four-year required English program. The focus will be a study of British literature, focusing upon forms, genres, and historical contexts. Materials include prose fiction and nonfiction, lyric and narrative poetry, and drama. The course emphasizes, throughout, the vocabulary building and the polishing of both written and oral expression that characterize the overall four-year program. Tests are designed to assess students’ understanding of the material intensive and reasonably comprehensive study of American literature, both as art and as an expression and reflection of historical, social and moral developments and forces in America, in the context of universal human values and psychology. A minimum of one outside reading book is required during the school year and each student is expected to have at least two interviews about his writing with his teacher in the course of the year.

    English IV Honors (2044) like the English IV college prep course, is a comprehensive study in British Literature from a literary and an historical perspective. However, there are a number of significant differences.  For example, the Honors course makes use of the Norton Anthology of English Literature. This text contains works, covered in the course, that are intrinsically more challenging to read and analyze than the works covered in the college prep course. Furthermore, in this course students are exposed to a diverse range of literary styles and genres that are then used as models of writing. Hence written interpretations are assigned often and examined and critiqued thoroughly in class by the teacher and by the other students. In addition, in-class essay examinations are administered after each chronological unit is read and discussed. These tests are prepared to assess students’ assimilation and appreciation of the literary development of each respective epoch and to aid them in further developing their writing skills. Also, since major authors such as Chaucer, Shakespeare, and Milton are covered in more depth than in the college prep classes, the tests and other assessments are more challenging. For example, Chaucer is read in the London dialect of his day; Shakespeare’s history play Henry the Fourth, Part One is read in addition to his tragedy Macbeth.

    English IV Advanced Placement (2045) deals essentially with the same material and requirements as the honors English program. In approach, however, there is less formal stress on the cultural, historical, and biographical context of the literature. Here, the major emphasis is on the close analytical criticism of individual texts, the discussions often being led by the students themselves. Throughout the year, a portfolio of short critical papers is developed. In-class and take-home tests are given that reinforce an Advanced Placement critical approach. Students are also required to keep a journal in which they are expected to respond either to supplementary readings or to assignments for class discussion. Finally, to receive AP credit, every student in this section is required to take the Advanced Placement Examination in English Literature and Composition when it is scheduled at the end of his senior year.
  • English Electives

    Cinema (2432) attempts to introduce the student to the elements and techniques of film art. It begins with the assumption that film, while being entertainment, is also a serious art form. Therefore, this course approaches this art form from three critical perspectives: analytical, historical/cultural, and aesthetic. The analytical approach breaks film down into its basic elements (i.e., photography, motion, sound; and dramatic/narrative structure) and considers how a filmmaker employs them to communicate a particular vision. The historical/cultural approach attempts to provide the background necessary for an appreciation of the evolution of film art. Finally, the aesthetic approach attempts to develop in the student the critical ability that will allow him to make a valid judgment on the artistic worth of any given film. To this end, shots, sequences, and entire films will be shown that illustrate the material covered in class lectures and discussions, styles of cinema in a particular period, specific genres, and the accomplishments of significant artists.
     
    Creative Writing (2142) is a senior elective. It is assumed that since the student “elected” this course, he must like to write and has a desire to do so creatively. As a result, students do quite a bit of writing, in both prose and poetry. Writing will be done on a daily basis. Writing exercises are done in class that lead up to the writing of a series of original short stories through the first two trimesters. If time allows, students are introduced structurally to the writing of plays and film scripts. Everything written by the student – whether at-home assignments or in-class exercises – are read out loud to the class and then critiqued in a workshop or seminar-type setting. The student is graded on both effort and ability.
     
    Honors Humanities Seminar (2644) addresses interesting and significant works drawn from literature, visual art, history, film, television, photography, dance, and other areas, providing a synthesis of the humanities, with new horizons opened up in the process. The course is designed to improve students’ analytical abilities and literary background in order to potentially enhance performance on the Advanced Placement exams and in college. It offers a chance to take on responsibilities and do advanced work that will prepare students to handle both assignments and classroom situations in college. Student should note that they will have no tests, quizzes, or exams. They will have papers, special projects, many chances to lead the class, daily discussions and analyses of works, and a good deal of reading. Students must get approval from the English Department Chair and from the Teacher of this course.
     
    Mark Twain: America’s Master Storyteller, Essayist, Lecturer, and Humorist (2733) This full-year Honors course is a study of America’s most famous author and storyteller whose literature is loved to this day by a worldwide audience because of his extraordinary life and diversity of writings. Students will see the relevance of his stories and truths of life in all its stages as crucial for their growing up in a complex and turbulent world. Throughout their lives, whether rich or poor, happy or sad, successful or failing, they will be uplifted to know that Twain has already felt the same and that they aren’t alone, they have reason to endure and have the awareness and courage to refine our human faults. They will learn that Twain’s writings will increase their reading comprehension through his communicative abilities to stimulate their senses, their emotions, and their imaginations. A commensurate objective is to increase the student’s critical thinking skills in command of language, grammar, and vocabulary through extensive readings, audio and film adaptations, and written reactions. This course is open to all 11th and 12th grade students.
     
    Sports Literature (2542)  This elective, tentatively titled “Sports in Literature and Movies,” will give sports-minded students the opportunity to read several literary works in the area of sports and also provide ample opportunities for writing and discussion. It includes four major works (two in the first trimester and then one in each of the following trimesters). In addition, each student will also read one other book (“outside reading”) independently. At least five movies will be shown as well. Assessments will include quizzes on the readings and reaction papers after discussions of the literary works. Movie viewing in class will be followed with discussion and then a reaction paper or critique. The course also includes a segment on sports journalism with one project per trimester (ideally covering a Seton Hall Prep athletic event). Other possibilities for class participation include debate topics in the world of sports. The course is intended to encourage students to read and also provide more opportunities to write, with both the reading and writing done in a field of student interest.  
     
    Science Fiction (2742)  ‘Science-Fiction'’ is a broad term and an even broader genre. The goal of this course is to engage with texts that fall into this ambiguous genre, hoping to tease out what the great Sci-Fi stories are angling for.  This course is laid out chronologically regarding the historical publishing dates of the various novels, but contemporary critical, psychological, sociological, and, of course, scientific and technological viewpoints and studies will be applied to each reading.  Because this is an English course, students will utilize a great deal of literary terminology, but the content applied to the texts will be far-reaching.  Ultimately, the goal of the course is to create sophisticated thinkers who write clearly.

Fine Arts Curriculum

List of 7 items.

  • Fine & Performing Arts Scope and Sequence

    All students are required to complete one year of a fine or performing art in order to graduate from Seton Hall Prep.
     
    Fine and Performing Arts Scope and Sequence
    Normal scope and sequence do not apply to this department. Course that have prerequisites have indicated that in their descriptions below.
  • Band & Performing Arts Courses

    Band (1112, 1132, 1142) is one of the few courses in the school that a student may take in all four years at Seton Hall. It is the only course where grades 9 through 12 work together and function as a team. The course is presented to those students who enjoy music and playing in ensemble form. Basic musicianship is developed by playing. Various styles of concert band music are played ranging from “Classical” to “Popular. The Band is offered at both the college prep and the honors levels.
     
    The basic description is the same with the requirement of a much greater time commitment at the honors level. Honor students are expected to be leaders and helpers to those with lesser skills. The best of these players have the opportunity to play in our spring musical as part of a pit band. This helps to give valuable experience to young men who may be considering a future in the field of music.
     
    Students may take band as a regularly scheduled elective or, in 10 , 11 , and 12 grade, as an additional elective beyond their regular schedule. Students who choose the additional elective have a verbal contract to attend as many lunch periods and morning activities as possible. As a pre-requisite, each student must have at least one year of either private lessons or have had involvement in a school music program (at their former school or at Seton Hall Prep), and must exhibit a minimal ability to read music.

    Brass/Wind Ensemble (1242) is designed to improve musicianship skills, including sight reading and ensemble playing. Members will study ensemble literature from a wide variety of styles ranging from the "Classical" repertoire to modern genres. Students must make themselves available for concert. performances both on and off campus. They will be informed of the concert schedule in a timely manner. The course will meet day 2 in the afternoon, days 4 and 5 in the morning and on days 1, 3 and 4 during the second half of the lunch period. This course does not fulfill the requirements for a full 6 credit course.

    Jazz Band (1342) is designed for students with the desire to perform. The group has limited instrumentation. Admission is by audition only. Students are required to perform in two mandatory school concerts a year. Students will play music from the standard repertoire as well as newer compositions specifically for Jazz Band and newer arrangements of pieces. The course stresses listening as well as playing. This course does not fulfill the requirements for a full 6 credit course.


  • Drawing & Media Production

    Drawing I (1632) is a college prep level elective designed to serve as an introduction to creative drawing. It is structured to develop the individual skills of beginners as well as students with some previous experience. The course tries to demystify the procedures of creative drawing by the simple application of basic drawing principles. By learning and practicing these principles, students find that there is no such thing as a person who cannot draw. The students are required to work every day in class as well as on weekly homework projects.
     
    Drawing II (1644) is an honors level elective specifically designed as a continuation of Drawing I. This course allows students to further develop the skills and techniques that were introduced in Drawing I as well as new mediums and method of artistic expression.
     
    AP Drawing (1745) is an advanced placement level elective intended for highly motivated students who are seriously interested in the study of Art. The course is open only to students who have demonstrated a high level of technical ability and a responsible attitude towards their personal artistic development. The object of the course is to prepare the students to meet the requirements of the Advanced Placement program in Studio Art (Drawing Portfolio). The students’ portfolios include a variety of mediums such as pencil, pen, watercolor, pastels, charcoal, acrylics and markers. The students in this course are expected to work every day in class as well as weekly homework and long-term independent projects. The course is structured to provide an approach that is disciplined, yet flexible enough to allow for individual growth and expression. At the end of each trimester each student must present his work for evaluation. Students are graded on quality, effort, improvement and creativity.

    Media Production (0832) is a CP credit course designed to provide students with hands on experience in the ever-changing world of digital art, working with industry standard software and equipment. The curriculum covers a wide range of areas including digital photography, video production, and web design.
    This course will include a photo and/or video lab at the honors level.
  • Music Theory

    Music Fundamentals I (1232) This course will focus on the creative process behind original music composition. The curriculum will also address music as a subjective artform, music as a cross-cultural method of communication, an introduction to ethnomusicology, an introduction to music theory, and music as a vehicle for meditation and self-expression. Students are not required to have a background in music to take this course. The lab portion of this class will be comprised of original electronic musical compositions recorded in GarageBand. A MacBook for each student will be provided by the school. This course will only be offered to students in grades 11 and 12.
     
    Music Fundamentals II Honors (1244) To be placed in this course, students must either successfully complete Music Fundamentals I or meet with Mr. Neglia to discuss their unique musical background to receive special permission. Students must be able to read in both treble and bass clef, know all major and minor key signatures, and have a base level understanding of the functionality of a digital audio workstation (DAW). This course will expand upon all the subjects covered in MF1 but will also involve a much deeper focus on formal musical analysis and music theory. This course will only be offered to students in grades 11 and 12.
  • Speech

    Speech (2532) The goal of the course is to aid students in the public speaking process, as well as teach them what effective speech making is, and why it is effective.  Although this is a college prep level course open to all interested students, students must have demonstrated the ability to work well in a less formal class structure. The course will encompass all of the steps necessary for communication in front of large and small groups. Areas of concentration will include: a history of speech with a concentration on rhetoric as an art form; an extensive viewing of and/or listening to effective speeches throughout history; an analysis of the written text of both student speeches and famous speeches; segments on particular speechmakers and writers; and a presentation on debate. Each of these segments will serve as a context for the main thrust of the course, which is, getting the students to speak in front of the classroom.
  • Theatre Arts

    Theater Arts (1832) is a hands-on college prep level course for beginning students of theater. It focuses specifically on the areas of stage design and construction, makeup, costume design and construction, lighting, sound, and acting. Students are expected to bring enthusiasm to the course. This course requires students to participate fully in both the fall and spring school productions. This means hours beyond classroom time at rehearsals, set construction, or both. Students are strongly encouraged to attend professional productions on their own. Students who attend are given critiques to complete and receive extra credit for this work.
  • AP Art History

    AP Art History (4345) is a full year elective course. The class is taught on a level of a college introductory art history survey course. Students will learn to identify and analyze major works of art from the ancient world to the present day in both an historical and cultural context. To cover such a wide range of material, the class must be by nature very fast paced. Students who elect to take this course must be responsible for a good deal of outside reading and research, including a summer project and visits to area museums. By the end of the course students will be prepared to take the College Board Advanced Placement Art History Exam. Prerequisite: Students must be in Honors English or History as a Junior, with at least a grade of B.

Languages Curriculum

List of 5 items.

  • Languages Graduate Profile, Sequence, and Placement Guidelines

    All students are required to complete two years of the same language in order to graduate from Seton Hall Prep. The majority of students at Seton Hall Prep complete three or four years of their language study because Tier 1 and 2 colleges require this. An increasing number of students are taking up an additional language their senior year.
     
    Note that all our modern language classes, starting in Level 1, are conducted in the language being learned in order to provide the students with the immersion experience they need.
     
    Upon successful completion of a four‐year program in a modern language offered at Seton Hall Preparatory School, we expect that our graduate would be able to demonstrate that he can:
    1. Communicate and interact in a range of situations.
    2. Respond to statements and initiate and sustain conversations with increasing linguistic accuracy.
    3. Comprehend fluent speakers in everyday situations.
    4. Communicate orally with increasing logic and accuracy.
    5. Recognize and understand verbal and nonverbal cues within a culture.
    6. Explore and discuss similarities and differences among various cultures.
    7. Explore and discuss representative artistic works of diverse cultures.
    8. Analyze interrelationships between the language and the culture of a given group of people, as evidenced in their literary works and communications, as well as in their political, economic, and religious structures.
    The Italian AP, Latin AP, Mandarin AP, Spanish AP Language, and Spanish AP Literature courses prepare students for the corresponding Advanced Placement test in May. Consequently, these courses involve a greater time commitment.

    Language Scope and Sequence

     
    9th Grade
    10th Grade
    11th Grade
    12th Grade
    College Prep
    Spanish I CP Italian I CP
    Spanish II CP Italian II CP
    Spanish III CP
    Italian III CP
    No option to continue.
    Honors
    Spanish I H Latin I H Mandarin I H
    Italian 1 H
    Spanish II H Latin II H Mandarin II H
    Italian II H
    Spanish III H* Italian III H* Latin III H
    Mandarin III H
    Spanish IV H Italian IV H Mandarin IV H
    Advanced Placement
    Spanish II H
    Spanish III Honors*
    Spanish III H*
    Spanish AP
    Spanish AP
     
    Latin I H
    Italian III H*
    Language
    Language
     
    Italian I H
    Latin II H
    Spanish IV H
    Spanish AP
     
    Mandarin II H
    Mandarin III H*
    Latin III H
    Literature
    Independent Advanced Studies
     
     
    *Optional Test to Place into AP Offered in March
    Italian IV H
    Mandarin IV H
    Latin IV AP
    Chinese AP
    Italian AP
     
     
     
     
     
     
    Guidelines for Language Placement: Please note that all placement decisions are made at the time of course selections and will depend on continued high performance through the conclusion of the academic year. If a student's placement is expected to change due to superior performance by year's end, this will be indicated to the Counseling Department at the time of course selection.
    • Current Honors students will remain at the Honors level provided they maintain a B average for the year in their current course.
    • Current College Prep students who wish to place into the Honors level must demonstrate independent-minded academic success, maintain an A+ average for the year in their current course, and have a recommendation from their current teacher.
    • At the time of course selection, current Spanish III Honors students may take a placement test to move ahead to AP Spanish Language and Culture. This may afford more flexibility when selecting senior-year courses and also opens up the possibility of taking AP Spanish Literature and Culture.
    • At the time of course selection, current Italian III Honors students may take a placement test to move ahead to AP Italian Language and Culture. This may afford more flexibility when selecting senior courses, as well.
    • Advanced Placement courses are Latin, Italian, Mandarin, Spanish Language and Culture, and Spanish Literature and Culture.
    • Note that College Prep students may not be able to continue their studies for four years, as most languages offer only Honors-level courses beyond the second level. The great majority of Seton Hall Prep students (perhaps 75%) applies to one or more Tier 1 or 2 colleges and will need at least three years of study in his language. If a student is planning to apply to competitive colleges, he may be required to take four years of a language; therefore, he must plan ahead and do well in his language study.
  • Italian

    Italian I (3412) This first-year course introduces students to the fundamental skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Italian. Students will master basic vocabulary and grammar and converse on basic, everyday topics. By the end of their first year, students will be familiar with various aspects of daily life in Italy and will develop an appreciation for Italian art, history, and the close connection between Catholicism and the Italian culture. 
     
    Italian 1 Honors (3414) Italian I Honors is a faster-paced introduction to speaking, listening, reading, and writing in Italian, as well as an introduction to Italian culture. By the end of this course, students will have acquired the basic vocabulary and grammar necessary to be able to communicate in spoken and written Italian. They will also develop an appreciation for Italian art, history, and the close connection between Catholicism and the Italian culture.
     
    Italian II (3422) This course further develops students’ competence in the basic skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing begun in first-year studies. Stress is placed on all modes of communication. Learning activities incorporate pronunciation, vocabulary acquisition, and more complex grammar to empower the students to increase their oral and written skills. Students deepen their knowledge of Italian culture through class discussions and readings about various aspects of daily life in Italy. 
     
    Italian II Honors (3424) This course further develops and hones the students’ basic skills in speaking, listening, writing and reading in Italian. Students acquire and make use of more extensive vocabulary, always within the context of real-life situations. Stress is placed on all modes of communication. During this course students are exposed to all verbal tenses so that by the end of the course students are able to converse about present as well as past and future activities. In addition to refining and perfecting their communicative skills in the target language, students increase their knowledge and familiarity with different aspects of daily life in Italy as well as develop a greater appreciation for Italian history and art.
     
    Italian III (3432) In this third-year course, students continue to develop the speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills that they have acquired during their first and second years of Italian. Particular emphasis is placed on expanding vocabulary and using all modes of communication so that students are able to understand authentic materials and express themselves with confidence in Italian. Cultural competencies are woven into daily instruction and of course class activities are conducted in Italian. 
     
    Italian III Honors (3434) In order to be prepared for the AP Italian class, students in this second- or third-year course advance their speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills. Particular emphasis is placed on expanding vocabulary and mastering grammar so that students are able to express themselves with confidence in Italian. Cultural competencies are woven into daily instruction. During the spring semester, students are introduced to the great Catholic work of Dante Alighieri, the Commedia, and complete a close reading of representative canti of the Inferno.
     
    Italian IV Honors (3444) This course enhances students’ proficiency in listening, speaking, reading and writing in Italian. Always within the context of real-life situations and aspects of daily living, students acquire knowledge of more detailed vocabulary and expand their command of more complex grammatical structures, such as the historic past and the subjunctive mode. Through a vast array of authentic Italian literature and the viewing of short and full-length films, students acquire knowledge of current social and political issues facing Italian society.
     
    AP Italian Language and Culture (XXXX) This course enables students to become Italian speakers who can share their opinions in writing or speaking on a variety of topics. Students who enroll already have a good knowledge of the language and culture of Italy and have attained a proficiency in listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Students read authentic Italian literature and view short and full-length films, thus acquiring knowledge of current social and political issues facing Italian society.

     
  • Latin

    Latin I Honors (3514) This class introduces students to the Latin language and Roman history. Through readings from both textbooks and ancillary sources, the students will not only learn the basics of Latin but will develop a better understanding and appreciation of the English language.
     
    Latin II Honors (3524) Students will leave behind the short, fabricated readings of Latin I Honors and now read longer narratives adapted from authors such as Ovid, Catullus, and Vergil, in the context of the rich culture and mythology of the Greco-Roman world. The course will cover all remaining grammar forms and culminate with a reading of entirely unadapted selections from Caesar's De Bello Gallico.
     
    Latin III Honors (3534) Students now read fully unadapted passages from original classical authors in both prose and poetry by the greatest authors of the ancient world, including Julius Caesar, Ovid, and Vergil, and become immersed in the culture of the Greco-Roman world. The students begin developing their analytical and syntactical skills in preparation for the AP course.
     
    AP Latin (3545) In the AP class, students deep-read from the Aeneid, Vergil's mythological masterpiece, and Julius Caesar's De Bello Gallico, one of the most illustrious historical texts of all time. The objective of the course is reading, translating, understanding, analyzing, and finally interpreting the Latin text. At the conclusion of the course all students will sit for the AP exam in Latin.
  • Mandarin Chinese

    Mandarin I Honors (3714) Mandarin I Honors is an introduction to the speaking, listening, reading and writing of Mandarin Chinese. It introduces pinyin, the phonetic Romanization of Chinese words, as well as the writing of Chinese characters. By the end of this course, students will be able to communicate in spoken and written Chinese to describe themselves, their family and friends; use numbers to decipher quantitative data such as dates and times; and finally to discuss everyday topics such as hobbies, school, and food.
     
    Mandarin II Honors (3724) Mandarin II Honors continues the fundamental language skills acquired in Mandarin I Honors. At this level, students will be able to use spoken and written Chinese to describe their school life and daily routines, navigate their community and ask directions, as well as complete everyday tasks such as correspondence, shopping and ordering food. Mandarin II Honors focuses on the development of literacy skills necessary to prepare students for more advanced Chinese courses, with particular attention paid to Chinese radicals and character families.
     
    Mandarin III Honors (3734) Mandarin III Honors integrates the previous topics introduced in previous Mandarin classes. Students will compare and relate various aspects of their life, such as their home and school environment, the weather, extra- curricular activities and their health. Students will continue to gain cultural knowledge of the history and values of China, its minority communities and other Chinese speaking countries. Students will be able to provide more nuanced arguments of their perspectives in both written and spoken forms through activities such as essays, debates and public presentations.
     
    Mandarin IV Honors (3744) Chinese IV Honors is an upper-level Chinese class designed to develop more advanced language skills while taking a look into Modern Chinese society, with a particular emphasis on its perspectives, products and practices. Topics ranging from education, family, technology, economy and politics will all be discussed. The bulk of materials will come from selected readings, films and resources from the internet.
     
    AP Chinese* (3745) AP Chinese is intended for students who wish to prepare for the AP Chinese examination. They will demonstrate their proficiency in Mandarin Chinese across a number of broad themes, such as family and community life, global challenges, and science and technology. Students who enroll should already have a solid knowledge of Chinese language and culture and should have attained a high proficiency in listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing.
     
    *Enrollment is limited to those students who have completed Chinese IV Honors or have tested into the class and received the instructor’s permission.
     
    Mandarin VI Independent Study (3746) Mandarin VI Independent Study is intended for those students who have already exhausted the Chinese curriculum, including AP Chinese. Students will meet concurrently with AP Chinese students while completing an independent study on a selected topic of Chinese culture. Students will locate, read and summarize materials in order to obtain a deeper understanding of their chosen research topic as they relate to the AP thematic units. At the culmination of the year, the student will present one specific element of their topic as a research report. Report results will be written in an extended research paper and shared in a public forum so that the audience can provide questions and feedback.
     
  • Spanish

    Spanish I (3612) This introductory class introduces the student who has not studied Spanish to the fundamental skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing in the language. Emphasis is placed on interpersonal communication. Learning tasks incorporate vocabulary memorization, pronunciation, and grammatical foundations. Presentation of cultural topics increases the student's knowledge and awareness of the Spanish-speaking world.
     
    Spanish I Honors (3614) Spanish I Honors is a faster-paced introduction to speaking, listening, reading, and writing in Spanish, as well as an introduction to Hispanic culture. By the end of this course, students will have acquired the basic vocabulary and grammar necessary to be able to communicate in spoken and written Spanish. They will also develop an appreciation for Spanish art, history, and the close connection between Catholicism and Hispanic culture, especially in New Jersey. The students gain an appreciation of the culture of different Spanish-speaking countries.
     
    Spanish II (3622) In this class students will advance in their basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing, emphasizing spoken communication. Presentations of authentic and varied cultural materials expand the student's knowledge of Spanish-speaking countries and the people who speak Spanish.
     
    Spanish II Honors (3624) This class develops students’ competence in the basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing and gives them the confidence to express themselves on more advanced topics. The emphasis is on communication, especially concerning understanding of cultural perspectives in communities where Spanish is spoken. Through authentic resources including literature, art, music and film, students acquire knowledge of current social and political issues in the Hispanic world.
     
    Spanish III (3632) This class prepares students to connect to a multilingual world using 21st-century skills. Students will learn to communicate effectively and interact with global competency. Students are expected to understand the main idea of authentic texts, short films, movies, media, music and the arts and to participate in spontaneous conversation, make presentations on familiar topics, access, and evaluate diverse perspectives. The tasks students will perform will be tailored to their specific language level in order to match their language abilities.
     
    Spanish III Honors (3634) In order to be prepared for AP Spanish at the end of the year, students will now be able to communicate effectively and interact confidently in cross-cultural situations and be able to understand the main idea of authentic texts, short films, movies, media, music and the arts. Students will participate in spontaneous conversation, make presentations on familiar topics, access, and evaluate diverse perspectives. This class prepares students to connect to a multilingual world using 21st-century skills.
     
    Spanish IV Honors (3644) This course is intended for students who already have knowledge of the Spanish language and Hispanic culture. Spanish IV Honors emphasizes the development of advanced reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills. Students will be exposed to diverse types of authentic resources, such short films, movies, cultural articles, and audio activities. Students will work in small groups, pairs or individually to foster the development of communicative proficiency.
    AP Spanish Language and Culture (3645) This course is intended for students who wish to further develop their proficiency in all four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students who enroll already have a good knowledge of the language and culture of Spanish-speaking peoples and have attained a reasonable proficiency in listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Students will sit for the AP Spanish Language ad Culture exam in May.
     
    AP Spanish Literature and Culture (3646) This course is intended for students who already have taken AP Spanish Language. Students will read, study, and analyze illustrious works by 39 authors. The selection of works includes poems, short stories, plays, and essays. Students will master their language skills while discussing works by Spanish, Latin American and US Hispanic authors of different time periods. AP Spanish Literature prepares students to take the AP Spanish Literature exam in May.

    Independent Research Studies in Spanish (XXXX)
    Students will study Hispanic film (fiction and documentary), literature, current events, and visual art as a means to deeply analyze Hispanic society and culture. The prerequisites for this course are AP Spanish Language and Culture, AP Spanish Literature and Culture, and a teacher’s recommendation.
     

History Curriculum

List of 7 items.

  • History Graduate Profile, Sequence, and Placement Guidelines

    All students are required to complete three years of history in order to graduate from Seton Hall Prep.

    History Department Profile
    At Seton Hall Prep we are concerned that students come to appreciate the discipline of History as the ability to think critically about the choices facing them in the present, rather than just a mastery of names, dates, and facts from the past. We expect our students to be well prepared to pursue historical studies in college, and to participate as informed and thoughtful citizens in our democracy.
    The single most critical skill fostered by our program is the ability to read critically and analytically. There will be reading assignments throughout the courses and over the summer; these are designed to challenge the students both in terms of material and in the presentation of differing perspectives. Students will be held strictly accountable for all reading assignments.
    Students will also be expected to:

    SKILLS:

    1. Demonstrate an appreciation of a wide range of differing perspectives, including those based in ethnicity, gender, and class;
    2. Read and analyze primary and secondary sources, identifying source, audience, purpose and context;
    3. Use and interpret maps, timelines, graphs, charts, and political cartoons;
    4. Understand the interpenetration of individual, local, national, regional and global perspective in historical analysis;
    5. Develop proficiency with analytical essay writing and oral presentation;
    6. Acquire research skills using both print and electronic media, and write a significant research paper that incorporates these sources;

    CONTENT:

    1. Compare and contrast societies over time;
    2. Analyze the interrelationships between cultural, religious, social, political, economic, technological, and environmental processes and institutions;
    3. Trace the development of major themes over time; including national identity, individual liberty, and citizenship; empires, sovereignty, the rise of the nation-state, self-determination, and revolution; the development of human dignity in terms of issues relating to slavery, class, gender, and ethnicity; economic development, capitalism, equality and inequality, globalization, technological change, and environmental awareness.
    4. Discuss issues of social justice in a historical context, grounded in the principles of Catholic Social Teaching;
    5. Analyze the causes of social conflict and a variety of approaches to conflict resolution;
    6. “Know the elements of the present by understanding the past.”
    History Department Scope and Sequence:
     
    9th Grade
    10th Grade
    11th Grade
    12th Grade
    College Prep
    World History I CP
    World History II CP
    U.S. History II
    Microeconomics  Government and Politics
     
    Honors
    World History I Honors
    World History II Honors
    U.S. History II Honors
    Government and Politics Honors
    Advanced Placement
    AP Human Geography
    (Seton Scholars)
    AP World History: Modern
    AP U.S. History
    AP Microeconomics
    AP U.S. Government and Politics
    AP Modern European History
     
    Placement Guidelines for Grades 9-11
     
    Placement in the different academic levels of the Sophomore World History and the Junior U.S. History courses is made during the year, on the basis of each student’s performance in his current history course.
     
    The general guidelines are:
    • for student to remain at the Honors or AP level he should maintain a B or better in his History course and an overall GPA of 3.75 for Honors and 4.0 for AP.
    • for a student to move up to the Honors level, he should have at least an A in his current history course and an overall GPA of at least 3.75
    • for a student to move up to an Advanced Placement level, he should have at least an A+ in his current history course and an overall GPA of at least 4.0
     
    Placement is based on these general guidelines, but final decision is made by the department, on the basis of teacher recommendation, and with the input of the chairperson and other members of the department. This recommendation is usually based on the following factors:
    The quality of the work demonstrated by the student in his current history class, and not on the possibility of a better performance at a more demanding level next year.
     
    Since the Honors and Advanced Placement levels involve a greater expectation for independent work by the student, one of the major criterion for placement into these courses is the consistency of the student’s work ethic, as demonstrated by completion of homework, projects, quizzes, and tests on time.
     
    Since the Honors and Advanced Placement levels involve a greater expectation that the student can consider competing interpretations and points of view, the second major criterion is that the student has shown some ability in this area, in both class discussions and in his written work.
     
    Failure to exceed minimum requirements, or go beyond standard answers, as well as lack of active class participation are all indications that a student should continue at his current level, even if his grades indicate that a higher placement might be appropriate. This is the basis of teacher discretion.
     
    Placement decisions will be made at the time of each grade’s course selection. In all cases the placement is conditioned on the student completing the current year successfully.  If a student slated for the honors or advanced placement levels next year begins to have problems in the remainder of the year, including missing assignments, we would reevaluate the placement. Similarly, a student who shows a marked improvement in the remainder of the year could have his placement reviewed for a more demanding level.
     
    Requests for elevation must be made before May 15.
  • World History

    World History I and II: College Prep Level This is a two-year program in World History designed to study changes and continuities in humankind’s cultural, social, political and economic institutions, with an emphasis on comparing major societies and analyzing levels of interaction and interdependence between them. The first year of the program covers the major societies up to approximately 1450-1500. The second year of the program continues the course into the present. The college prep level of this program is designed to teach basic analytical reading and writing skills.
     
    World History I and II (4314, 4324): Honors Level This is a two-year program in World History designed to study changes and continuities in humankind’s cultural, social, political and economic institutions, with an emphasis on comparing major societies and analyzing levels of interaction and interdependence between them. The first year of the program covers the major societies up to approximately 1450-1500. The second year of the program continues the course into the present. The honors level of this program is designed for students who have already mastered basic analytical reading and writing skills and therefore greater emphasis will be placed on weighing conflicting historical evidence and differing interpretations and points of view. These courses will involve a more comprehensive survey of all major societies and civilizations, which will require students to do some independent reading and research in both years.

    World History AP (4225) This is a one-year course designed to prepare students for the Advanced Placement test in World History. The course examines the nature of changes and continuities in humankind’s cultural, social, political and economic institutions, with an emphasis on how local conditions relate to global processes, as well as comparisons among major societies. It emphasizes relevant factual knowledge used in conjunction with leading interpretive methodologies and types of historical evidence. Periodization forms an organizing principle, which focuses on the participation of the world’s peoples in processes that transcend individual societies and cultural regions.
    School guidelines indicate a student normally needs to maintain a B average on tests in order to sit for the AP exam. The successful completion of several practice exams, administered in preparation for the actual AP, is also a prerequisite in sitting for the AP exam.


  • U.S. History

    U.S. History CP (4022) This is a one-year course covering the history of the United States from the colonial period to the present. The course is a basic survey course designed to provide students with the analytical skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and materials of U.S. history. While the course will move chronologically and provide an overview of many of the major events and figures, it will not attempt a comprehensive account of such an extensive period. Instead, the student will consider important historical themes: demographic change, economic transformations, environment(s), politics and citizenship, reform, and religion. The primary goal is to contextualize how these themes contribute to an American identity, while respecting the nation’s uniquely diverse composition.
     
    U.S. History Honors (4034) At the honors level, students will be expected to analyze differing perspectives and points of view, which will require more reading and research than at the college prep level. Placement in Honors will be made by the History Department based on a student’s work in the freshman and sophomore year courses in history. Students must have already demonstrated above-level reading skills, writing proficiency, and an ability and commitment to do independent work.
     
    U.S. History AP (4135) This course is designed to provide students with the analytic skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and materials in U.S. History. It will prepare them for intermediate and advanced collegiate level courses by approximating a similar level of academic rigor. Students will continue to learn how to assess historical materials-their relevance to a given interpretive problem, their reliability, and their importance-and to weigh the evidence and interpretations presented in historical scholarship. A primary goal of the course is for students to demonstrate the ability to write concise essays that provide appropriate evidence in support of clearly articulated and informed arguments. School guidelines indicate that students normally need to maintain a B average on tests in order to sit for the AP exam. The successful completion of several practice exams, administered in preparation for the actual AP, is also a prerequisite in sitting for the AP exam.
  • AP Human Geography

    AP Human Geography (4015) this course is designed to be the equivalent of a college-level introductory course, and will prepare students for the Advanced Placement test in Human Geography. The purpose of the AP Human Geography course is to introduce students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use, and alteration of Earth’s surface. Students employ spatial conceptualizations and landscape analysis to examine human social organization, and the environmental consequences of human habitation. They also learn about the methods and tools geographers use in their science and practice.
     
    School guidelines indicate that a student normally needs to maintain a B average on tests in order to sit for the AP exam. The successful completion of several practice exams, administered in preparation for the actual AP, is also a prerequisite in sitting for the AP exam.
  • Economics

    Economics These courses are designed to provide students with the analytical skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and materials of microeconomics. The course is offered on both the advanced placement and the college prep levels.

    The college prep (4142) level is designed as a general introduction to Economics for all students. While we do not screen for this level, there is a mathematics requirement for the course. Students must have completed, or be enrolled in, one of the Precalculus or Statistics courses in order to take Economics; students enrolled for College Algebra are not eligible for this course.
     
    To qualify for the Advanced Placement level (4145) of the course, students must maintain a minimum 4.0 cumulative average with at least a 4.0 in their current math course. The student should also be scheduled for an honors level of mathematics in senior year. Students who register for the advanced placement level are committing themselves to take the Advanced Placement test in microeconomics in the spring.
  • U.S. Government & Politics

    The United States Government and Politics- course is a one-year senior elective that will be offered on the Honors, and AP levels. The course is a natural follow-up to the US History course. While the course begins with a serious consideration of the Constitution, the emphasis is on politics and policies in the past two decades.
     
    In general, students would be approved for the level of the course that they are currently taking in their US History course. Any student wishing to move up from CP to Honors must have an A in their current US History course and the approval of their current teacher.
     
    United States Government and Politics Honors (4354) The United States Government and Politics Honors level course is a full-year senior elective. The course will include the following topics: constitutional underpinnings of United States government; political beliefs and behaviors; political parties, interest groups, and mass media; institutions of national government; public policy; civil rights and civil liberties. This course includes both the study of general concepts used to interpret U.S. government and politics, and the analysis of specific examples and current issues.
    Acceptance in the honors level will depend primarily on the student’s performance in the junior U.S. History course. The general guideline would be a B or better in the honors or AP level of the US History course; an A+ at the CP level of that course.
     
    United States Government and Politics-AP (4355) is a one-year senior elective designed to prepare students for the Advanced Placement test. This AP test is designed to be equivalent to a one-semester college introductory course in United States government. As described by the AP program, this course includes both the study of general concepts used to interpret
    U.S. government and politics and the analysis of specific examples. It will require familiarity with the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute U.S. government and politics. The course will include the following topics: constitutional underpinnings of United States government; political beliefs and behaviors; political parties, interest groups, and mass media; institutions of national government; public policy; civil rights and civil liberties. Prerequisite: Students must have completed the AP US History or Honors U.S. History course with a grade of B or better.
  • Contemporary European History Honors

    Contemporary European History Honors (4244)  (senior elective)
    This course is designed to introduce students to the story of European civilization since the French Revolution, and place that story into the larger context of global history. Important topics will include Liberalism, Conservatism and Communism; Revolutionary Movements; Imperialism and Colonization; Nationalism; Race and Nation; the Transformation of Gender and Social Structures; Multipolarity and Unipolarity through the World Wars and the Cold War; Immigration; Terrorism; Decolonization and Globalization. While the course will be rooted in Europe’s history, that story will be set against the backdrop of an increasingly globalized world, which influenced Europe and Europeans, as much as Europe influenced the world. The students will emerge with an understanding of modernity, and those challenges facing Europe and the world in the 21st century. For those students interested in taking the Advanced Placement test, a synopsis of Europe’s history from 1450 to 1789 will be offered, as well as structural support in preparing for the exam.

Mathematics Curriculum

List of 7 items.

  • Math Graduate Profile, Sequence, & Placement Guidelines

    Math Department Profile
    The Seton Hall Prep Math Department stresses student understanding that mathematics is a discipline with wide-ranging application to thinking and problem solving. The purpose of a math education lies not just in teaching students how to solve everyday problems, but also in teaching them how to think critically, logically and abstractly. Mathematics is an organized way to understand certain kinds of phenomena: numerical, geometric, algebraic, trigonometric, and probabilistic, among others. It is important that graduates receive training in skills necessary for continuing mathematics at their desired college level and that graduates aim at understanding how math relates to the world. Like the rest of our world, mathematics can be explored and discovered. Students will be held to standards focusing on:
    • Fostering problem-solving, higher-order thinking, critical thinking skills and collaboration.
    • The ability to formulate and solve mathematical problems.
    • The ability to apply mathematical procedures appropriately including properties, definitions, theorems, postulates and axioms.
    • The ability to reason analytically and hypothetically.
    • The ability to collaborate with others.
    • Development of advanced computation skills and evaluation of algebraic formulae.
    • The use of technology and graphing calculators.
    • Graphical analysis including: collection of data, interpreting that data, and analyzing graphs.
    • Emphasize the use of good mathematical language and terminology.
    • Daily preparation for class, organizational skills, and responsibility in producing quality work.
    • Appreciation of math application in the real world through the use of mathematical models.
    Math Department Scope and Sequence:
     
     
    9th Grade
    10th Grade
    11th Grade
    12th Grade
    College Prep
    Algebra I CP
    Geometry CP
    Algebra II CP
    College Algebra/
    PreCalculus/ Statistics
    Honors
    Algebra I Hrs
    Geometry Hrs
    Algebra II Hrs
    PreCalculus Hrs
    Advanced Placement
    Geometry Hrs Algebra II Hrs
    Algebra II Hrs PreCalculus Hrs
    PreCalculus Hrs Calculus AB AP
    Calculus AB AP Calculus BC AP
     
    *Geometry Honors, Algebra II Honors and PreCalculus Honors are offered over the summer to advance your math placement for the following year *Calculus BC AP is available after completion of Calculus AB AP *Statistics AP is available as an elective
     
    The Mathematics Department has established placement guidelines. While the placement and course selection process will take place in the spring, I ask that you please review these guidelines. The guidelines are as follows:
    • Current CP students will remain at the CP level. Current CP students who wish to move to the Honors level must maintain an A+ average for the year in their current course and have a recommendation from their current teacher.
    • Current Honors students will remain at the Honors level provided they maintain a B average for the year in their current course. Current Honors students who do not maintain a B average for the year in their current course will move to the CP level.
    • Current AP Calculus AB students may take AP Calculus BC next year provided they earn a score of 3 or better on the AP Calculus AB exam.
    • Current Pre-Calculus Honors and AP Calculus AB students may take AP Statistics next year provided they earn an A or A+ average for the year in their current course.
    • Current PreCalculus Honors students who are not eligible to take AP Calculus AB are eligible to take Calculus Honors at the discretion of the Department Chair. Students may not transfer into or out of this course and students who complete this course are not eligible for AP Calculus BC.
  • Aglebra I

    Algebra I CP (6012) is designed to provide the student with a solid foundation in several core mathematical concepts including the real number system, word problems, linear and quadratic equations, factoring, systems of equations, functional relationships, graphs and radicals. Students will learn the practical applications of problem solving, both as it relates to mathematics and as it applies to the rest of the school’s curriculum.
     
    Algebra I Honors (6014) covers real numbers, solution of linear and quadratic equation and inequalities, problem solving, operations with polynomials and functions, factoring, systems of linear equations, functional relationships and graphs. The homework problems assigned are the most challenging ones in the text. This course will require proficiency in completing these most difficult problems and correct usage of the mathematical language
  • Geometry

    Geometry CP (6022) is a course in Euclidean Geometry with an introduction to Coordinate Geometry and includes some review of Elementary Algebra. Students encounter the geometry they need for both further study of mathematics and for the Scholastic Aptitude Test. Students also encounter the idea of a two column deductive proof - first to be able to follow one, then to be able to construct one. Geometry offers a considerable base of necessary factual knowledge and the opportunity to develop analytical thinking.
     
    Geometry Honors (6024) is a course in Euclidean Geometry with an introduction to Coordinate Geometry and includes some review of Elementary Algebra. Students encounter the geometry they need for both further study of mathematics and for the Scholastic Aptitude Test. Students also encounter the idea of a two column deductive proof - first to be able to follow one, then to be able to construct one. Geometry offers a considerable base of necessary factual knowledge and the opportunity to develop analytical thinking.
  • Algebra II

    Algebra II CP (6032) This course is designed to develop an understanding of Algebra as a structure of systems of real and complex numbers. Students will develop and cultivate a facility in complex algebraic concepts, skills, and associated problem solving strategies. Students will learn the practical applications of organizing data, graphing, and modeling, both as they relate to mathematics and as they apply to the rest of the school’s curriculum. This course will require students to develop proficiency in solving moderately challenging problems, thereby not permitting much time for review of Algebra I concepts. Additionally, some time and effort will be devoted to SAT and ACT preparation.
     
    Algebra II Honors (6034) is designed to develop an understanding of Algebra as a study of the structure of systems of real and complex numbers, and to develop a facility in algebraic concepts and skills. Students should become familiar with problem solving strategies and techniques. Students will also be taught how to use a TI-84+ for topics including but not limited to graphing functions, solving equations, and Trigonometric evaluations. Additionally, some time and effort will be devoted to SAT and ACT preparation.
  • PreCalculus

    PreCalculus CP (6042) is designed such that special emphasis is given to the algebraic skills that are needed in Calculus. This study includes basic algebra, polynomial functions and an in depth study of trigonometry.
     
    PreCalculus Honors (6044) is designed to prepare students for college level Calculus in anticipation of Business, Science, Mathematics, and/or Computer Science majors. This study includes a rapid review of Algebra followed by a comprehensive consideration of Polynomial Functions, Analytic Geometry and Trigonometry. Note: per the Math Department Placement Guidelines, only students earning a final grade of A or higher will be eligible to take AP Calculus. Students earning a final grade of B or B+ will be eligible to take Calculus I Honors.
  • Calculus

    Calculus Honors (6144) This course is designed to prepare students for college Calculus and other math courses in anticipation of Business, Science, Mathematics, and/or Computer Science majors. Topics include functions, limits, derivatives, integrals, sequences, series, and applications of these concepts. Students will not sit for the AP exam and placement is made at the discretion of the Department Chair.
     
    AP Calculus AB (6145) is a full year Advanced Placement Course, which is the culmination of a four course vertical sequence of Honors classes that have prepared the students to work at the Advanced Placement level. Successful students will be prepared to study to meet any mathematics requirements at competitive universities and to for further study in math and/or science at the college level. College credit will be available through the AP Testing Program for successful students at most colleges and universities. This class is an elective but does require departmental approval for registration.
     
    AP Calculus BC (6245) is a full year Advanced Placement Course, which is the culmination of a four course vertical sequence of Honors classes that have prepared the students to work at the Advanced Placement level. Successful students will be prepared to study to meet any mathematics requirements at competitive universities and to for further study in math and/or science at the college level. College credit will be available through the AP Testing Program for successful students at most colleges and universities. This class is an elective but does require departmental approval for registration.
    Underclassmen who take this class will take Part II of Calculus BC in the next school year.
  • Statistics

    Statistics CP (6342) introduces the student to the study and application of statistics. Statistical methods are carefully presented with a focus on understanding both the suitability of the method and the meaning of the result .Statistical methods and measurements are in the context of applications.
     
    Honors Statistics (6344) Introduces students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. Students are exposed to four broad conceptual themes: Exploring Data: Describing patterns and departures from patterns, Sampling: collecting data, Anticipating Patterns: exploring random phenomena using probability, and Statistical Inference: estimating population parameters and testing hypotheses.

    AP Statistics (6345) introduces students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. Students are exposed to four broad conceptual themes: Exploring Data: Describing patterns and departures from patterns, Sampling and Experimentation: Planning and conducting a study, Anticipating Patterns: Exploring random phenomena using probability and simulation, and Statistical Inference: Estimating population parameters and testing hypotheses. Students who successfully complete the course and exam may receive credit, for a one-semester introductory college statistics course.

     

Science Curriculum

List of 7 items.

  • Science Graduate Profile & Course Sequence,

    All students are required to complete three years of science to graduate from Seton Hall Prep, one of which must be in Biology. 
     
    Science Department Profile
    Our students will have taken an average of four of our science courses upon graduation. They will be scientifically literate members of our society; they will be prepared for a collegiate scientific major, if they so desire; and they will have respect for our natural world and will be stewards of it. Many students will have taken more than four sciences at our school, and those students will have reinforced those qualities. They will pursue their scientific interests and will be more prepared to handle the rigors of scientific aspirations in college.
     
    Even if our graduates do not enter college as science majors, they will be prepared to handle the requirements of collegiate science courses. Regardless of their future academic pursuits, our graduates will have exercised their analytical skills and understand how science relates to other fields.
     
    Students will appreciate that the scientific method and science itself is dynamic. While students must have a firm understanding of specific concepts, they will realize that science is more than content – it is an active process.
     
    Students will be expected to:
     

    SKILLS:

    1. Integrate mathematics into the sciences, including the preparation and analysis of graphs. Students will be more proficient in math because they will have applied their mathematical skills to the sciences.
    2. Record, process, and analyze data.
    3. Evaluate research.

    CONTENT:

    1. Understand major scientific theories and their connection to the world outside the classroom.
    2. Understand the properties of matter and energy.
    3. Understand cellular processes, including an extensive study of DNA.
    4. Understand evolution as it relates to all aspects of cellular, organismal, and ecological biology.
    5. Understand that science is an active process.

    VALUE:

    1. Respect our natural world and be stewards of it.
    2. In short, the science department will foster these qualities by driving the content of our curriculum with a wealth of hands-on activities and methods that require our students to analyze the material.

    CLICK TO VIEW SCIENCE PATHWAY CHART
  • Physical Science

    Physical Science College Prep (7412) is designed to provide students with an outstanding grasp of our physical environment and of their role in it. In addition to providing substantial physical and chemical background for further scientific studies, the curriculum is integrated with dynamic analytical approaches to Earth Science.
     
    Physical Science Honors ( ) is similar in content to the Physical Science CP course, but material is covered in greater depth in both the lectures and the labs.
  • Biology

    Biology CP (7022) is designed to extend the students’ understanding of the structure and function of all living things. Students continuing in the field gain a strong background and foundation; others gain an ability to function in a society that is becoming technologically and scientifically advanced. This course relies heavily on clear thinking, organization, and interpretation. Studies begin with the bio-chemical and cellular basis of life and culminate in an understanding of the living organism and its interaction with the environment.
     
    To place into Biology CP, a student must meet the following requirement:
      • Successful completion of Physical Science or Chemistry.

     
    Biology Honors (7024) is similar in content to the College Prep Biology course, but material is covered in greater depth in both the lectures and the labs. Students interested in medical or science careers will especially benefit from this course.
     
    To place into Biology Honors, a student must meet the following requirements:
      • A minimum of a 4.0 for the year in Physical Science or Chemistry;
      • A minimum of a 4.0 average in English;
      • A minimum of 3.75 overall GPA;
      • Departmental recommendation.
     
    Advanced Placement Biology (7145) is designed to prepare students for the Advanced Placement exam in May. This course is designed to present all the material that is taught in a full two-semester sequence of biology as taught at a major college or university. It is a college-level course in terms of the amount of material, the pace of instruction, and the level of work expected of each student, including independent work. One of the main goals of the course is to prepare students for the Advanced Placement Biology test given in May, and all students who register for this course will be required to take that test at the discretion of the teacher. Students in this course will be required to devote extra time to out-of-class study, review, and lab exercises. Because of the complex nature of some of the labs required for the AP test, class during activity periods and lunch will be required regularly.
     
    To place into AP Biology, a student must meet the following requirements:
      • A minimum of a 4.0 for the year in Honors or CP Chemistry;
      • A minimum of a 4.0 average in English;
      • A minimum of a 3.75 overall GPA;
    Departmental recommendation.
  • Chemistry

    Chemistry CP (7032) includes the study of matter and energy, phases of matter, atomic structure, chemical reactions, and bonding. This course is designed so that students will understand and appreciate the important role chemistry plays in their lives as they gain the scientific literacy to understand that role.
     
    To place into Chemistry CP, a student must meet the following requirement:
      • A minimum of a 2.5 average in Algebra.
    Chemistry Honors (7034) is similar in content to the CP Chemistry course but will require a greater level of analysis of the material while it also serves as a foundation for students who wish to enroll in AP Chemistry eventually.
     
    To place into Chemistry Honors, a student must meet the following requirements:
      • A minimum of a 4.0 for the year in Physical Science or Physics.
      • A minimum of a 4.0 average in Algebra.
      • A minimum of a 4.0 average in English.
      • A minimum of a 3.75 overall GPA
      • Departmental recommendation.
    Advanced Placement Chemistry (7345) is designed to prepare students for the Advanced Placement exam in May. This course is designed to be the equivalent of a college introductory course for science and related majors such as premed. It will provide the information required for a student to receive college credit through the Advanced Placement test in May. The textbook, course content, and the chemical calculations are similar to those in an introductory, college chemistry course Students in this course will be required to devote extra time to out of class study, review, and lab exercises. Because of the complex nature of some of the labs required for the AP test, class during activity periods and lunch will be required regularly.
     
    To place into AP Chemistry, a student must meet the following requirements:
      • A minimum of a 4.5 for the year in a completed Chemistry course;
      • A minimum of a 4.0 average in Algebra;
      • A minimum of a 4.0 average in English;
      • A minimum of a 3.75 overall GPA;
      • Departmental recommendation.
    Organic Chemistry High Honors (7744) is an honors-level course that is focused on the study of the carbon bond.  It is the  largest and one of the most important branches of chemistry. Organic chemistry surrounds us in every aspect of our lives. Plastics, petroleum products, medicines, food additives and clothes are made from the products of organic chemistry. In this introductory course, students will learn about naming compounds, functional groups, synthesis and stereochemistry. Students who are contemplating majoring in a science or the health care profession should take this course. Students taking AP Chemistry should consider taking this course since there are questions related to organic chemistry on the AP test. Offered in 2021-2022
     
    To place into Organic Chemistry Honors, a student must meet the following requirements:
      • A minimum of 3.5 for the year in a completed Chemistry course;
      • A minimum of 3.75 overall GPA;
      • Departmental recommendation with teacher approval.
    Honors Independent Study in Chemistry  (7144) This course offers an option for highly motivated, high-achieving students who have completed the highest level chemistry courses (AP and/or Organic) to continue studying chemistry and related topics in a less structured format.  The first part of the course is an introduction to an area of chemistry new to the student, with an emphasis on connecting new concepts to those with which the student is already familiar from previous science courses.  This is done through a combination of reading, some formal lectures, and hands-on training in new scientific techniques.  The first year will focus on computational chemistry, so we will start by reviewing the general theory of computational chemistry, and how it can be used to address real scientific questions, and the students will get some practice with simple exercises to introduce them to computational chemistry software.  Approximately halfway through the year, students will identify specific scientific questions and/or areas of computational chemistry that are of particular interest, and will begin to formulate a specific research project that they will conceive and pursue using computational chemistry tools.  The project and its results and conclusions (where applicable) will be written up in the format of a scientific journal article as a major component of the overall course grade.
  • Physics

    Physics I CP (7042) develops an understanding of various physical processes. The course will make use of a three-stage learning cycle. The first stage is an exploration stage that is used to create an interest in the unit of studies; the second stage develops the concepts; the third stage is an application of the concepts through laboratory work, mathematical problem solving and discussions of critical thinking questions. While the College Prep course will not be as mathematically demanding as the Honors level course, it still requires the ability to perform mathematical calculations at the level of Precalculus. Students who do not yet qualify for Precalculus may not sign up for the Physics elective.
     
    To place into Physics CP, a student must meet the following requirements:
      • A minimum of a 3.0 in Algebra II;
      • Students must qualify to take Precalculus.
    AP Physics I AP Physics 1 is an algebra-based, introductory college-level physics course. Students cultivate their understanding of physics through inquiry-based investigations as they explore these topics: kinematics, dynamics, circular motion and gravitation, energy, momentum, simple harmonic motion, torque and rotational motion.

    AP Physics C: Mechanics (7065) is designed to prepare students for the Advanced Placement exam in May. AP Physics C: Mechanics is equivalent to a one-semester, college-level, calculus-based physics course, especially appropriate for students planning to specialize or major in physical science or engineering. Because of the complex nature of some of the labs required for the AP test, class during activity periods and lunch will be required regularly.
     
    To place into AP Physics C, a student must meet the following requirements:
      • 4.0 in any Calculus course;
      • 4.0 in any Physics course;
      • Departmental recommendation.
  • Environmental Science

    Environmental Science CP (7132) is an interdisciplinary survey course that is designed to build upon the training imparted by previous science classes. The course provides information on the composition and conservation of our environment.
    Upon completion, students will understand the environment, threats to it, and the importance of environmental protection and conservation. Students will be assessed using homework assignments, quizzes, and exams. Students who take College Prep Environmental Science are not permitted to take AP Environmental Science.
     
    To place into Environmental Science CP, a student must meet the following requirements:
      • Successful completion of Physical Science;
      • Successful completion of Biology.
     
    Advanced Placement Environmental Science (7135) is designed to prepare students for the Advanced Placement exam in May. Students will encounter the material that would usually be taught in a college-level Environmental Science course.
    Upon completion, students will understand the environment, threats to it, and the importance of environmental protection and conservation. The course will involve lectures, labs, and extra readings.
     
    To place into AP Environmental Science, a student must meet the following requirements:
      • A minimum of a 4.0 average in Biology;
      • A minimum of a 4.0 for the year in a completed Chemistry course—or—the student is enrolled concurrently in Chemistry.
      • A minimum of a 4.0 average in English;
      • A minimum of a 3.75 overall GPA;
      • Departmental recommendation.

    Marine Science Honors
    Marine science is an interdisciplinary course that studies the world’s oceans. This course investigates the geological, chemical, physical, and biological aspects of coastal and marine environments. Students will be presented with topics such as waves, tides, currents, water chemistry, marine habitat zonation, invertebrate biology, and vertebrate biology. Additionally, this course will explore human interactions within marine communities, ranging from our dependency on marine resources to anthropogenic impacts on marine habitats. 
    • To place into Marine Science Honors, a student must meet the following requirement: Successful completion or co-enrollment in Chemistry
  • Electives

     
     
    Marine Biology Honors (summer ONLY) is a Summer Enrichment course that focuses on exploring the dynamic marine environment, which encompasses over 70% of the Earth’s surface. The course examines the biology of marine organisms and the abiotic factors (e.g. nutrients, water currents, and tides) and biotic factors (e.g. competition and predation) that influence their distribution and abundance. Specific topics will include primary and secondary production, rocky intertidal diversity, salt marshes, estuaries, subtidal communities, coral reefs, pelagic and deep-sea communities, and human impacts on the ocean. In addition to classroom lectures, this lab course will involve hands-on activities including numerous dissections, experimental design, and many field trips to marine habitats and aquariums. This course is open to students from all grade levels. It provides an excellent foundation to AP Environmental Science. (This course does not fulfill the Biology graduation requirement; all students must take CP, Honors, or AP Biology.) Course enrollment is limited to 12 students.
     
    To place into Marine Biology Honors, a student must meet the following requirement:
      • A minimum of 3.5 average in the Sciences.

Computer Science and Technology Curriculum

List of 3 items.

  • Computer Science & Projects

    Computer Projects: CP (0642) has no prerequisite. Students use computer programs as they would in their future careers as they investigate the newest computer developments. At the end of the course, they will possess a portfolio that includes highly stylized and formatted documents, high-functioning spreadsheets, and professional presentations. Their collection will also include simple webpages that they have coded themselves, as well as a full website created with top design software. These webpages will include photos, graphics, and videos they have designed and altered themselves. They will even construct Phone Apps and will 3-D print artifacts of their own design. They will have investigated a variety of the better online programs and supplements available in the Cloud. Because technology changes so rapidly, we will be open to exploring new content not listed here.

    Programming with Java Honors (0742) is designed to introduce the concept of programming languages by examining programming using the Java language, which is the language established for the Advanced Placement test in computer programming. The focus is on programming as problem solving. While there will be considerable hands-on work in the computer lab, students will also be required to do a significant amount of “book” and “paper” work to master the basics of the course. Students will be exposed to Android software development.
     
    To place into Programming with Java Honors, a student must meet the following requirement:
      • A minimum of a 3.0 average in Math.
     
    AP Computer Science A (0745) is designed to prepare students for the Advanced Placement examination in Computer Programming in May. This course is focused primarily on programming with JAVA. The students will be expected to commit extra time throughout the spring to prepare for that AP exam. Students who do not qualify for the AP exam will receive honors level credit for the course and will be required to take an in-house final exam. Students who register for the course may concurrently enroll in AP Computer Science Principles.
     
    To place into AP Computer Science A, a student must meet the following requirements:
      • A minimum of a 3.5 average in Math;
      • A minimum of a 3.75 GPA.
    Advanced Placement Computer Science Principles (0935) is designed to prepare students for the Advanced Placement exam in May. This course introduces students to the central ideas of computer science, instilling the ideas and practices of computational thinking and inviting students to understand how computing changes the world. The rigorous course promotes deep learning of computational content, develops computational thinking skills, and engages students in the creative aspects of the field. Students are encouraged to apply creative processes when developing computational artifacts and to think creatively while using simulations to explore questions that interest them. The course is organized around the investigation of seven big ideas, all of which are fundamental principles essential to thrive in future college courses and a variety of STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics) careers. These integral understandings can be applied in further studies of computer science and provide a pathway for becoming a well-educated and informed citizen who understands how computer science impacts people and society. Students who register for the course may concurrently enroll in iOS App Development or AP Computer Science A (JAVA programming).
     
    To place into AP Computer Science Principles, a student must meet the following requirements:
      • A minimum of a 3.0 average in Math;
      • A minimum of a 3.75 GPA.


  • iOS App Development


    iOS App Development Honors (0934) is similar in content to the College Prep iOS course, but material is covered in greater depth in both the lectures and the projects.
     
    To place into iOS App Development Honors, a student must meet the following requirement:
      • Must be a rising junior or senior.
  • STEM & Engineering

    Python Programming Project-Based Learning CP (0042) This course will introduce students to Python programming through projects. Students will complete those projects individually or in small groups, and they will present updates to their projects frequently. Students will also learn about physical computing and at least one project will require the integration of physical computing with Python. 

    Robotics Honors (0244) Using VEX EXP kits, students will learn the fundamentals of robotics such as design, build, and computer programming. Topics will be multidisciplinary there will be a focus on iterative design and problem solving. Students will explore how to integrate code with physical objects, create machines that will respond to a stimulus, and eventually create robots that can run autonomously to complete a task on their own. The goal of the course will be to introduce students to the expansive role robots and autonomous machines have in our society, along with providing a basic understanding in how they function. To be placed into Introduction to Robotics, students must meet the following requirements: 
    • A minimum GPA of 4.00 in sciences 
    • A minimum overall GPA of 3.75 
    • A rising junior or senior OR a rising sophomore that has COMPLETED honors physics (per Mr. Trinh’s recommendation)

     
    STEM Problem-Based Learning Honors (7154) is designed to provide students with the opportunity to use the scientific method to research areas of their choosing. Students will be permitted to perform pure scientific research, or they can develop a product or solution to a societal problem. Students will research local competitions for their work and enter them after they ensure that their projects conform to the various requirements. Students will be encouraged to make connections with local businesses and/or colleges to further develop their research. While some work can be completed in class, the students should expect an extraordinary amount of work beyond the class time. Additionally, students will have several meetings over the summer before the school year begins. This course meets from 8:00-8:40 each morning; students MUST be in class by 8:00 each day. Course enrollment is limited to 16, so students may have to complete an entrance project to qualify.
     
    To place into STEM Problem-Based Learning, students must meet the following requirements:
      • Must be a rising junior or senior;
      • Must have completed (prerequisite) or be currently enrolled in (corequisite) Physics;
      • Must be in class by 8:00 every day;
      • A minimum of a 4.0 average in the sciences;
      • A minimum of a 3.75 overall GPA.

Theology Curriculum

List of 5 items.

  • Theology Graduate Profile, Sequence, and Placement

    All students are required to complete four years of theology in order to graduate from Seton Hall Prep.

    Theology Department Profile
    A Graduate of Seton Hall Prep will…
    • Be engaged in the quest for answers to the perennial questions of human existence, and in particular understand and appreciate the distinctive Catholic approach to these questions which is rooted in a response to the person of Jesus Christ.
    • Understand that theology is dialectical in nature, and therefore is only fulfilled in a personal commitment to search for and follow the truth.
    • Understand the notion present in Catholicism and some other Christian traditions that the truth of God can be accessed via faith in response to Divine Revelation and reason in response to the order that God has established within His creation.
    • Understand that in Catholic teaching, revelation is transmitted through Sacred Scripture and Sacred Tradition. Further, the graduate will understand the particular ways in which the Church preserves the essence of this revelation, e.g. the creed and the hierarchy.
    • Be able to appreciate and demonstrate the method of interpretation of Scripture present in Catholicism and some other Christian Traditions that is neither fundamentalist nor relativist.
    • Appreciate the self-understanding of the Church as the “Body of Christ”, continuing the work of Christ on earth, and bearing the gospel message to its members and to the world. The graduate will understand the development of the Church’s significant offices and practices, and appreciate the differences that exist among the major Christian denominations.
    • Understand Liturgy as the “work” of the Church, and understand the elements of worship, the Structure of the Mass, and the liturgical year. Further, the graduate will appreciate the aesthetic, spiritual, practical and solemn dimensions of public worship.
    • Appreciate and understand a Catholic approach to morality that emphasizes the role of reason in moral deliberation, the importance of doing good and avoiding evil, the focus on the common good in the analysis of all moral issues, and to see the Church’s tradition of moral teachings in the light of Jesus’ call to love God and one’s neighbor.
    • Understand the basic principles of Catholic Social Teaching, with a special emphasis on the fundamental dignity of the human person, economic justice and the option for the poor, the promotion of peace, and global solidarity.
    • Understand the notion of vocation as a fundamental aspect of Catholic Christian Life, with a particular appreciation of the meaning of work, family life and Holy Orders in Catholic life.
    • Understand that theology is the intellectual aspect of a life of faith, and that therefore a personal development of a “life in the Spirit”, including prayer and spiritual practices, is essential for faithfulness to Christian living.
    Scope and Sequence
     
    9th Grade
    10th Grade
    11th Grade
    12th Grade
    College Prep
    Introduction to Catholic Theology CP
    Ecclesiology and Moral Theology CP
    Sacred Scripture CP
    Senior CP Theology
    Honors
    Introduction to Catholic Theology H
    Ecclesiology and Moral Theology H
    Sacred Scripture H
    Senior Honors Theology
     
    PLACEMENT GUIDELINES FOR SOPHOMORE, JUNIOR AND SENIOR THEOLOGY COURSES
    Placement in the different academic levels is made after the first half of the year on the basis of each student’s performance in his current theology course and teacher recommendations.
     
    Criteria which are to be met prior to the request to change a placement:
      • For a student to move up to the Honors level, he should have at least an A in his current theology course and an overall GPA of at least 3.75.
      • For a student to remain at the Honors level he should maintain a B or better in his theology course and an overall GPA of 3.75.
      • Requests to move from Honors to CP level are discouraged and will be handled on a case-by-case basis, if a request is made by May 15.
      • All changes are made on the condition that the student completes the year successfully. A recommendation for higher placement can be revoked after placement conferences if a student fails to meet the above criteria by the end of the year.
    Criteria for Teacher Recommendation:
    1. Since the Honors level involves a greater expectation for independent work by the student, one of the major criteria is the consistency of the student’s work ethic as demonstrated by completing all assignments including homework, projects, quizzes, and tests on time.
    2. Since the Honors level involves a greater expectation that the student can consider multiple interpretations and points of view, the second major criterion is that the student has shown some ability in the areas of analysis and writing.
    3. A student doing solid work but not going beyond minimum requirements, or standard answers, or not participating actively and intelligently in class discussions is best continuing at his current academic level even if he meets the grading requirements to move to a more demanding academic level.
    4. Placements are made on the basis of the work that the students have demonstrated in their current theology class and not on the possibility of a better performance at a more demanding level next year.
    *Seniors interested in Peer Leadership have a separate application process that is administered by the Peer Leadership program. A student interested in Peer Leadership will be placed first in either Honors or CP according to the criteria above, and then those selected for Peer Leadership are re-placed in Peer Leadership. Students may take Honors or CP theology and Peer Leadership if they wish.
  • Freshman Requirement

    Introduction to Catholic Theology CP (5312) provides a broad-based introduction to important basic areas of Catholic Theology, including: Christian anthropology, revelation; Christology; scripture and tradition; Church; Liturgy and Sacraments; and moral Theology
     
    Introduction to Catholic Theology Honors (5314) follows the same outline as the CP course but features more challenging readings (including primary sources) and writing assignments which require more in-depth analysis.
  • Sophomore Requirement

    Christology and Moral Theology CP (5322) is required for all sophomores. It is divided roughly equally between Ecclesiology and Moral Theology. In Ecclesiology we cover the nature and mission of the Church. In the process we look at such topics as the development of the Church through history and the roles of the laity and the hierarchy of the Church. In Moral Theology we cover the moral methodology of the Catholic tradition and discuss the application of this methodology to selected topics.
     
    Christology and Moral Theology Honors (5324) follows the same outline as the CP course but features more challenging readings (including primary sources) and writing assignments which require more in-depth analysis.
  • Junior Requirement

    Sacred Scripture CP (5332) is a course required of all Juniors. It is divided into two major sections. The Old Testament portion of the course is designed to help students appreciate the Old Testament both on its own merits and in the way it has been traditionally interpreted within Christianity. A special emphasis is placed on the study of the Pentateuch, which is used to introduce students to source criticism. Studies of the monarchic period, the prophets, the exile, and wisdom literature are designed to help students see the ways in which the faith of our heritage grew and developed. The New Testament portion of the course is designed to help students appreciate the predominant role of the Scripture in the Church’s understanding of the person of Jesus. Each year, one gospel in particular is highlighted, matching the Sunday Liturgical cycle. There is also some study of the gospel of John each year, and the letters of St. Paul to the Corinthians are studied each year.
     
    Sacred Scripture Honors (5334) follows the same outline as the CP course but students are expected to engage in textual analysis at a rigorous level, supported by college level texts and independent research.
  • Senior Requirement

    Seniors may satisfy the Theology requirement with either the Senior CP Theology course, the Senior Honors Theology Course, or the Peer Leadership course. Placement in CP or Honors is made by members of the Theology Department; Peer Leadership requires a special application process.
     
    Senior CP Theology (5042) is a course in which the focus is theological reflection on the role of the mature Catholic Christian in society. In doing so, the course concentrates on three areas. One is introducing and fostering methods for personal spiritual growth; a second is a particular study of the tradition of Catholic Social Teaching, emphasizing a variety of issues; a third is a particular study of the Catholic understanding of marriage and family life.
     
    Senior Honors Theology (5044) - is essentially the same as in the CP course. However, a wider and more challenging selection of readings is employed, and more frequent written assignments of greater depth are required.
     
    Peer Leadership Seminar (5344) is an honors level course that involves training in leadership skills that will include summer, evening, and weekend time commitments. Participation in the summer retreat in August is an absolute requirement. Peer Leaders will serve as freshman homeroom moderators every day. Students may apply for the program, but the course will be limited; students will be selected on the basis of the interview process.

Health & Physical Education Curriculum

List of 1 items.

  • Requirements & Courses

    All students are required to complete two years of Physical Education in order to graduate from Seton Hall Prep.

    Normally students will take: 

    Health and Physical Education I (8612) is an activity class designed to help students gain an understanding of how to develop overall physical fitness including cardiovascular fitness, muscular strength and endurance, and coordination. This course is also designed to help students develop a positive attitude toward exercise and healthful living through participation in aerobic exercise, calisthenics, class lectures, and class discussion. This program includes skill development and the application of rules and strategies in the following different movement forms: (1) health-related fitness activities (cardio respiratory endurance, muscular strength and endurance, flexibility, and body composition), (2) aerobic exercise, (3) individual sports/activities, and (4) group sports/activities. Ongoing assessment includes both written and performance-based skill evaluations.
     
    Physical Education II and Drivers Education (8222) The Driver Education course is designed to prepare students for the written test for a New Jersey Driver’s License. The Physical Education builds on the skills and knowledge from the freshman Physical Education course to promote both physical and mental well-being through a program of fitness and conditioning, games, sports, tumbling, and weight-training.
     
    Physical Education and Weight Training. (8232) Students taking this course will develop greater levels of flexibility and strength. They will learn correct weight lifting techniques in relation to human muscular anatomy. Students will also explore the effects of steroids and other drugs on the body. Finally, they will develop a personal running program to meet their own personal needs and abilities.

    Fitness for Life: Health and Wellness (8042)

    This course will focus on the latest trends in health, nutrition, physical activity, and wellness. From stress management and sleep to overall well-being, we will explore personal health, health related attitudes and beliefs, and individual health behaviors. This course will cover nutrition, stress management, CPR, and lifetime activities such as running, golf, tennis, and volleyball.

    Mindfulness and Meditation (8142)

    We are all invited to grow. It is part of our nature. In this course, we will collectively answer the invitation through practices that help us become more aware of the truth of who we are in relation to ourselves, each other and God.

List of 3 items.

  • National Merit Scholarships

    We are incredibly proud to share with you that we have learned from the National Merit Scholarship Corporation that 22 of our young men have been recognized as National Merit Semi Finalist or Commended Students. Of the 1.5 million students who sat for the PSAT last fall, some 50,000 with the highest PSAT/NMSQT® Selection Index scores qualify for recognition in the National Merit®Scholarship Program. Commended Students are named on the basis of a nationally applied Selection Index score that may vary from year to year and is typically below the level required for participants to be named Semifinalists in their respective states. About 16,000 students, or approximately one-third of the 50,000 high scorers, are notified that they have qualified as Semifinalists. To ensure that academically talented young people from all parts of the United States are included in this talent pool, Semifinalists are designated on a state-representational basis. They are the highest scoring entrants in each state.

    This year Brandon Wang has been designated as a Semi Finalist, and we are more than hopeful that by maintaining his academic performance level he will be designated a Finalist.

    Additionally, the following students have been designated as Commended Students:Liam Bartie, Matthew Brennan, John Caramichael, Austin Chin, Ryan Compoli, Joseph Donahue, Bruno Fernandes, David Fleurantin,, Ron George, William Grabas, Karlis Kancans, Vincent Miller, Henry Mitsch, Daniel Nolan, Ian O'Hara, Daniel Quinn, Brett Rojas, Roy Samuel, David Truesdell, Adam Yawdoszyn, Jack Young
  • Advanced Placement Recognition

    Every year a large number of students take AP classes and sit for exams. Typically, if a student scores 3 or better (out of 5) on the exam, he is eligible for anywhere between 3 and 6 college credits. Many of our seniors graduate and begin college with advanced standing as a result of their work here at The Prep. The College Board also recognizes special achievement in a number of categories. Here is a brief description:
    • AP Scholar: Granted to students who receive scores of 3 or higher on three or more AP Exams. The Prep had 35 of these.
    • AP Scholar with Honor:Granted to students who receive an average score of at least 3.25 on all AP Exams taken, and scores of 3 or higher on four or more of these exams. The Prep had 18 of these.
    • AP Scholar with Distinction:Granted to students who receive an average score of at least 3.5 on all AP Exams taken, and scores of 3 or higher on five or more of these exams. The Prep had 46 of these.
    • National AP Scholar:Granted to students in the United States who receive an average score of at least 4 on all AP Exams taken, and scores of 4 or higher on eight or more of these exams. The Prep had 7 of these.
    Last year, 84.2% of students at The Prep passed their exams, as compared to 73% of New Jersey students, and 61% of students nationally. Last year 303 students sat for 648 exams in 22 areas. Higher achievement is truly the norm here at The Prep.
  • Graduate Profile

    As an academic community rooted in the Catholic tradition, we have a shared commitment to provide the programs, environment, and resources to enable each of our students to graduate successfully from Seton Hall Prep. By success we mean that the graduate of Seton Hall Preparatory School will be well prepared for college and the challenges of life beyond because he will have developed into a mature young man who has incorporated into his own life the things that this community cherishes.
    • He is deeply rooted in a knowledge of and appreciation for the Catholic tradition. He is able to articulate fundamental truths of the Catholic faith, is familiar with the truths of scripture and tradition, is committed to the dignity of every human person, and respects the sacramental aspects of life, prayer, and nature.
    • He values the promotion of the common good, appreciates a diversity of philosophical, cultural, historical, aesthetic, and linguistic expressions, including those that differ from his own, and is ready to assume his position as a citizen of his local community, the state, the nation, and the world.
    • He appreciates the development of the democratic tradition and is able to work with others for the good of the whole, with a special concern for the poor and marginalized in society.
    • He accepts responsibility for his decisions at both a personal and a social level. He knows how to balance the requirements of personal growth and of relationships, the demands of work, and of recreation. He consciously deals with issues of time and stress management.
    • He can articulate his own thoughts well both orally and in written forms. He is a critical thinker, capable of logical analysis, unique synthesis, and problem solving. He is comfortable using a variety of technologies to research, construct, and present his work.
    • He is an independent learner, self motivated in the pursuit of knowledge and the love of truth. He exercises personal integrity with reference to his work and his dealings with others, and appreciates his own responsibility for working to create a more just society.
    • He develops all aspects of his person, and values the pursuit of beauty and goodness along with the pursuit of truth. He is committed to the ideal of a sound mind in a sound body, and makes life choices consistent with that ideal.
    • He seeks his own growth within the context of service to others and is true to his family within the context of the entire human family. He values the insights of the Catholic tradition, as well as those of other faith communities, and seeks to promote harmony and mutual understanding. He is committed to the human dignity of all people, regardless of creed, class, gender or ethnicity.
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